Film

Film
 

Why Film?

A film is like a symphony. Countless art forms (photography, music, storytelling, acting, set design), each itself exquisite, offer their best to the service of a greater vision. The movies I admire most are the ones that reveal craftsmanship dedicated to a cohesive whole.

As a work of art, movies are a chance for us, the viewer, to crawl inside their creator’s head and see the world the way he or she does. Good movies are the ones that do this well, preventing obstacles from streaking that window and muddying that vision. I may not agree, but I will always leave with a better understanding of that framework. The movies I appreciate most are the ones that do this with honesty and excellence.

But the director is himself a sub-creator. He is part of our world, which itself reflects its Creator. Despite the director’s intentions, he will echo certain truths about our world into his art. As a moviegoer I seek, in the words of Jeffrey Overstreet, to "look closer” and notice such reflections. The movies I celebrate most are the ones that either hint at the possibility of redemption or whose world and characters reveal what desperate need we are in.

I am a regular contributor to Reel World Theology, have covered the Calgary Underground Film Festival, and am an annual guest on the Whatever This Is podcast.

 

On this page you will find my growing collection of movie reviews. The list on the right is usually out of date, so scroll down to the 'Recent Reviews' section or search the site to find recent pieces. 

 I also try to maintain a film diary over on Letterboxd.

For readers looking for a introduction or reminder of the skills worth cultivating for thoughtful moviegoing journey, I recommend my friend and movie mentor Jeffrey Overstreet’s essay, Viewer Discussion Advised: 12 Steps Toward More Nutritious Moviegoing.

 

 

Best of the year

Films of Character in 2013

 

 

Interviews

Early Breaks and 'Regulate': A Conversation with G-Funk Director Karam Gill

The Pursuit of Gorgeous Cardboard : A Conversation with John Charles Meyer of Dave Made a Maze